A man has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and is on a ventilator, but he’s not too worried about the $600 he owes his elderly neighbour.

Key points:A man has had an MRI scan and has been placed on ventilators to keep his brain functioningA woman has had a CT scan and is being assessed for the same conditionA patient and her family are worried about their elderly neighbourThe woman has been admitted to a hospital and is now being assessed about her condition, but the man said he doesn’t feel too worried.

The man said his daughter was diagnosed with dementia when she was a baby and he has a hard time coping with the fact his daughter’s dementia is not curable.

“It’s going to be a bit hard for a while, but I’m sure she’ll be back to her old self,” he said.

“She was a good child and a good person, and I miss her a lot.”

I’m going to keep going and going.

“The man’s daughter is one of the more than 30,000 people in Australia to have their health insurance covered by Medicare.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Health said the man’s case was unique and had nothing to do with the health system.”

Dr Jennifer Brown from the Queensland Institute of Health and Welfare said people with severe dementia may be at risk of getting the care they need.””

In some circumstances, people with dementia are eligible to access Medicare benefits.”

Dr Jennifer Brown from the Queensland Institute of Health and Welfare said people with severe dementia may be at risk of getting the care they need.

“They have a lot of problems, which are not always obvious to the family, or even to the doctor,” she told ABC Radio Brisbane.

“If you get a diagnosis of dementia, and then you go to a specialist, there’s a chance that you may not be able to see the specialist.”

Dr Brown said dementia had a number of distinct causes, including infections, brain damage, and some people may have mild symptoms, but have trouble managing them.

“The people with mild dementia have to be treated, but they also have to deal with a range.

So you can’t just go to the specialist and get your treatment,” she explained.”

You have to get help in your home and get support in your community and in your care.”

Dr Brown also warned that some people with advanced dementia may not benefit from Medicare.

“For the most part, people are not going to benefit from the Medicare benefit,” she suggested.

“But there are some people who are more at risk.

Some people will get Medicare but the rest will not, because they’re in a much more difficult situation.”

She said people at higher risk of Medicare should seek help from a specialist and be assessed by a doctor before accessing Medicare.

Topics:health,health-administration,health,dementia,covid-19,nsw,brisbane-4000,qld,brisbanon-4350,canberra-2600More stories from Queensland

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